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Lower Macchu Picchu and the Urubamba valley Edward Ranney  (American, b.b.1962)

Pablo Neruda’s moving poetic tribute to the Pre-Colombian mountain-top fortress known as Macchu Picchu, deep in Peru, is perfectly paired with Ranney’s sublime photographic records of this ancient, spiritual center of the Incas. Ranney has traveled to Peru, documenting the remnants of the vast civilization of the Incas for the past 25 years. The portfolio contains 11 hand pulled photogravures on 250 gram Arches cover white paper. The edition is limited to 60 copies signed by Ranney.

Edward Ranney (b. 1942) has been internationally recognized for his images of Inca and Mayan landscapes and architecture; Scientific American commented that Ranney did "more than any other photographer to show the works of the Incas as they are set into numinous mountain landscapes that somehow called forth those superb forms into stone" Ranney has received numerous awards, including two Fulbright fellowships for his work in Peru, a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, and a National Endowment for the Arts Photography Fellowship. His work has been presented in individual exhibitions at the Princeton University Art Museum, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, the University of New Mexico Art Museum, and the Centro Cultural of Miraflores in Lima, Peru.

Reproduced / Exhibited

Malcolm R. Daniel, and Florian Rodari. Graver La Lumière: L’héliogravure D’alfred Stieglitz À Nos Jours Ou La Reconquête D’un Instrument Perdu. Vevey, Suisse: Fondation William Cuendet & Atelier de Saint-Prex, 2002. p. 65