Heliogravure von K. Klic Klic, Karl  (Austrian, 1841-1926)

Heliogravure von K. Klic nach einem Gelatine-Emulsion-Negativ von Carl Haack

This rare print is perhaps the earliest published photogravure by Karl (Karel) Klíč. Klíč refined and improved the photogravure process to the extent that it is still widely used today.

Since the early 1850s the development of photography was documented and supported elaborately by magazines in France, England and Austria, the USA and Germany. None of these early magazines were as relevant as Photographische Correspondenz, particularly in German speaking regions. Founded in 1864, and edited by Ludwig Schrank as a periodical from practitioners for practitioners, with an emphasis on composition and the various genres of photography, including the practical aspects of photography as a fine art. Containing photogravures by Klic, Riffarth, Blechinger,Paulussen, Johannes Bayer, J Löwy, and Wilhelm Cronenberg, the content of the periodical negotiates photo-technical and photochemical innovations, provides guidance for professional photographers, examines new fine print methods as well as scientific, economic and esthetic aspects of photography.

The photographs for the most part came from Vienna studios. High-quality prints dominated its pages, using established reproduction processes that were economically beneficial. The majority of these fine prints were provided provided by Vienna studios and J. Albert, C. Aubel, K. Klietsch, Ch. Reutlinger, and L. Rutherfurd.

References

Hannavy John. 2008. Encyclopedia of Nineteenth-Century Photography. New York NY: Routledge. p. 1095